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Thursday, July 14

Our Broken Summer

On July 1st, a trampoline accident led to a broken tibia and a severely sprained ankle for our little Adventure Girl.  

AT THE HOSPITAL, TRYING TO BE BRAVE.

It was 11:20 am and to begin, I'm glad that we were there when it happened.  We were visiting friends who are big on "walk it off" mentality.  They don't "coddle" their children.  Mama Stacey is a huge coddler.  Their 3yo injured her elbow on the same trampoline and not only did they deny her rest/hugs/ice-pack... they did not take her to the doctor because they were certain she was faking it (although, between you and me, she had classic symptoms of a dislocated elbow).   We love our friends, but we have some serious differences in parenting styles.  

When Adventure Girl had her accident, she cried out and I immediately knew something was wrong.  As a parent, you can decode seemingly random screams based on pitch, intensity, etc.  I wasn't sure of my skills until that moment.  I now get a hint of what it must be like to speak the subtle languages of dolphins or grizzly bears.  Her cry, in that moment, was different from anything I have ever heard her make before. 

When I got to her, she could not put weight on her leg and the first thing she said was, "I go to doctor."  I lifted her and she began to weep.  As I carried her, she was passing out from the shock.  This is when our friend reassured me that my baby girl was "probably just tired" and "needed a nap".  My instincts were very different.  Papa J rushed her to the nearest emergency room (you should have seen his frantic parking job!).  Within 40 minutes they confirmed the break.  

SHE SLEPT FOR 16 HOURS AFTER HER LEG WAS SPLINTED.
  THEY DON'T MESS AROUND WITH CHILDREN'S PAIN MEDS.

It was heartbreaking to not only hear how severe the damage was, but to also find that she would need a full-leg cast for 8 or more weeks.  When the doctors left the room, we tried to cheer up our toddler by googling cool crutches and scooters, fancy swim covers, and talked about getting to pick out a cast color.  When they returned to put it in a splint, the other shoe dropped.  Her break was on the growth plate.  Adventure Girl was forbidden any weight bearing, scooting, sliding, or even dangling. No crutches.  No scooter.  No swim cover.  Only sitting or lying with her leg elevated.

We were told to immobilize our 3 year old daughter for the rest of the summer.

Now, you may be thinking to yourself, "Awe man, that sucks."  Or, "Wow, that sounds difficult."  

The truth is, you have no bloody idea.  Unless you've had this same misfortune, you can't appreciate how soul-crushing it is to tell your vibrant child that she cannot play in her sandbox.  She cannot swim on a 101* day.  She cannot swing or slide or seesaw.  She cannot ride her new bike.  She cannot ride the carousel at the fair.  She cannot come with for raspberry picking.  Even if her beautiful blue eyes beg you for all they're worth, you must break her heart to save her leg.

HER CAST WAS PUT ON 3 DAYS LATER,
AFTER THE SWELLING HAD GONE DOWN.

Just the day before, Adventure Girl had inquired about trying out a climbing wall and had been wowed by seeing some people kayaking down the gorgeous river we live near (because, as her title would suggest, she is always up for a new adventure).  We had planned to do both in the coming weeks. Instead, we pass the days reading, coloring, and watching Netflix. 

We try to fight off boredom with long stroller rides, but still the 'recuperation blues' have taken hold.  She refuses food, or pretends to eat it for my sake, hiding it underneath her booster seat.  She cries a lot and takes turns being mad at Papa J and I, who must disappoint her daily.  She complains of being tired. She picks at her cast.

BORED, BORED, BORED

We hold her often, singing to her and trying to comforting her.  It is a difficult time, but I try to see the silver lining.  As the doctor in the emergency room pointed out, he'd rather see her have a broken leg than a broken spine or neck.  Worst-case scenario, over 4,000 children have suffered hospitals stays, paralysis, and even death since 1990. By the Goddess' grace, Adventure Girl is not one of those children.

As my thoughts turn to Lammas and our traditional Tailteann games, I am struggling to find ways to include our girl.  My thought process then leads me to one of the very first posts on this blog.  In it, I promised to provide crafts and activities for children with restrictions and special needs.  I have done a poor job of doing so.  

I look to the Lord and Lady to help our baby girl find her joy and rekindle her spirit as summer continues on.  They have already used this minor tragedy to help me better my parenting skills and amp up my blogging game.   

Faith, my friends.  Faith.   

ITS EVEN HARD TO ENJOY A PONY PICNIC IN THE PARK,
WHEN YOUR LEG IS BUSTED.

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